Comet

Comet gives away a show of shooting stars

About the Lyrids

The Thatcher comet takes 415 years to go around the sun. In 1861 he last visited the inner solar system, to which the earth also belongs, and he does not return until 2276.

Yet every April we get to know what the comet leaves behind: a rain of falling stars, called the Lyrids, a swarm of meteors in the early morning hours.

The name Lyriden

The swarm is called that because the falling stars seem to originate in the constellation Lier. This constellation is quite easy to find because it has Wega, the fourth brightest star in the sky.

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Comet dust produces shooting stars

Comets consist of rock, dust and ice, and as they travel through the solar system, they leave dust and rocks behind. Their orbit therefore becomes a long strip of comet remains.

At the end of April the earth hits this tire, and the result is that dust and stones crash into our atmosphere at about 177,000 kilometers per hour and burn like falling stars.

Under dark conditions you can usually see 10 to 20 shooting stars per hour.

SEE THE LYRIDES

THIS IS YOUR WORK

  • When?

    The Lyrids can be seen in the second half of April, and especially in the night of 22 to 23 April. You have the best chance of observing them from 2 a.m. to 3 a.m. in the morning of 23 April.

  • True?

    You will find the point of origin at 3 a.m. 60 degrees above the southeastern horizon, that is, high above your head. The falling stars seem to come from this point, but they can pop up anywhere in the sky.

  • Photo opportunity?

    To photograph shooting stars, use a wide-angle lens, a tripod and an interval timer for your camera, so that your device takes photos while you enjoy the show.

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Video: Meteor Showers 101. National Geographic (January 2020).

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