Medical technology

Chip must replace laboratory animal

A small chip with artificial human tissue can replace animal testing in the future and make testing of medicines much more accurate.

A new research project from the US Food and Drug Authority aims to introduce a chip to replace laboratory animals and make drug testing much more accurate.

© Shutterstock

It is not much bigger than your thumb and can radically change the way we conduct research in the future.

A small chip that can imitate human organs has recently been included in a promising research project by the US Food and Drug Authority.

Thanks to this approval, we may be able to test new drugs in the near future without animal testing and with much greater accuracy.

Reproduced human organs

The chip consists of small channels of artificial, transparent materials that can be observed through a microscope.

When human cells are placed in the artificial structure, they behave like in the body.

And that means that they can imitate the way human organs respond to drugs and treatment methods, and scientists can be bothered.

Cancer tests are becoming more accurate

This can become of great importance, and not only in the field of animal testing. The tests that are being carried out are also much more accurate.

For example, an animal lung often does not respond exactly in the same way as a human lung.

While, for example, cancer treatments with immunotherapy are difficult to implement in animals because they are focused on certain proteins human immune cells.

Video: Science: Beating 'Heart-on-a-chip' Developed to Replace Human Organs (February 2020).

Popular Posts

Category Medical technology, Next Article

Do expired medicines still work?
Medicines

Do expired medicines still work?

The health authorities require that drug manufacturers provide their medicines with a best-before date, so that patients can be sure that a medicine is still working and that no toxins have been formed. Producers check the shelf life by storing a medicine in the recommended way and regularly testing its effectiveness.
Read More
Panacea cures psoriasis
Medicines

Panacea cures psoriasis

Ugly, red rash and flaking skin. These are the complaints of more than 200 million people with the autoimmune disease psoriasis. People who suffer from psoriasis often have pain and indicate that it affects their quality of life. The disease can also lead to depression, heart disease and diabetes.
Read More
What makes you bruise?
Medicines

What makes you bruise?

For example, if you have hit hard, the small blood vessels in your skin will be damaged. When those blood vessels are broken, the red blood cells from your blood penetrate the tissue. In this first phase of the bruise the blood is still red, because oxygen is added as soon as it flows out of the blood vessels.
Read More
Sugar tackles arteriosclerosis
Medicines

Sugar tackles arteriosclerosis

About 30 percent of all deaths worldwide are the result of cardiovascular disease. And arteriosclerosis is the biggest culprit within that category. Recently, however, an international research team succeeded in dissolving the source of atherosclerosis - cholesterol - in the blocked veins of mice.
Read More