History

Zombie fear in the Middle Ages: corpses were maimed before they went to the grave

Bones from the Middle Ages prove that the English heavily mutilated the bodies of deceased people to prevent them from walking again.

© British Library

At the excavation of the medieval town of Wharram Percy, archaeologists found human bones with special injuries.

Aerial view of the area where Wharram Percy was.

© Historic England

That's why they examined the bones.

And according to scientists from The Historic England and the University of Southampton, these injuries prove that our medieval ancestors were terrified of "living dead."

Burned and tortured after death

The residents of the medieval town of Wharram Percy had an extensive arsenal of torture methods. With this they wanted to prevent the bodies of deceased villagers from rising from the dead.

The skeletons were beheaded, harnessed with knives and burned shortly after the person died.

A rib with knife cuts

© Historic England

Historical sources already mention that people in the Middle Ages thought that bad and vengeful people could rise from the dead to attack or kill the living.

But the examined bones, from the 11th to the 13th centuries, are the first clear proof that people in the Middle Ages believed in zombies.

Intentionally mutilated

In total, the scientists examined 137 human bones of at least 10 people, including three adult women, two adult men, a teenager about 15 years old and two children between 2 and 4 years old.

Dr. Simon Mays, a biologist who specializes in human skeletons and works at The Historic England, tells in The Independent that it seems that the bones have been deliberately mutilated.

Video: Betrayal Legacy - Part 4. Game the Game (January 2020).

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