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Scientists want to use LSD as a medicine

The notorious substance may save you from depression and laziness, as long as you take it in very small doses.

A new test should show whether LSD can serve as a medicine if patients receive it in very small doses.

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Anxiety, panic and psychosis are just some of the side effects that LSD is notorious for. But now an international science team wants to prove that very small doses of the substance can have the opposite effect and actually cure these psychological disorders.

Small doses can become medicine

A new type of drug user has emerged in recent years. For example, people in the tech mecca Silicon Valley are experimenting with very small quantities of LSD. According to them, they get energy from it, makes LSD creative and it is good for their mood.

Others say that psychological problems such as anxiety and depression decrease with a so-called microdose of LSD.

But the scientific evidence is lagging behind. That is why an international team of experts in the field of mental illness, among other things, wants to conduct the world's first scientific research into whether microdoses of LSD can have a positive effect.

They want to administer test subjects 10, 20 or 50 micrograms LSD and use brain scans to map how their cognition (thinking ability) changes.

Short circuit in the brain signals

LSD is a so-called hallucinogenic substance that influences the signaling substances of the brain. The drug produces a psychotic state with distorted sensory impressions, feelings and hallucinations.

However, the substance can also cause panic and anxiety attacks or make users believe they can fly. In the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, doctors experimented with LSD as a remedy for mental illness, leading to suicides and psychoses.

Video: Your Brain on LSD and Acid (February 2020).

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