Nature

What is under the microscope: Slime mold or caries?

Liquid, cilia and cells loom in bright colors and beautiful shapes when we view the world from a whole new perspective with an advanced microscope. In micro country even known objects can be difficult to recognize. Are you succeeding?

© DALIBOR MATÝSEK / TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF OSTRAVA

Slime molds are fascinating organisms. They can transport their food along paths, just like ants, and they find their own way.

They often take even the shortest route from A to B. And for their reproduction, they create spores in special spore boxes (below on the photo).

A spore develops into an amoeba, looks like a crawling mucus and sheds fruit in all sorts of colors.

Although the slime mold has been known in science for hundreds of years, the researchers cannot get a hold of the special organism, which for example, like a normal mushroom, propagates via spores, but is not a mushroom.

He has previously been described as both a plant and an animal, but in the meantime the slime mold has been classified in the collection tank with protists: a group of organisms that are neither animal, plant nor fungus.

© SHUTTERSTOCK

Electron beam sees everything

The electron microscope uses a beam of electrons with a much shorter wavelength than light, which means that the resolution is considerably higher. The beam is reflected in certain patterns or traverses through a sample.

The lenses consist of magnets that direct the electron beam onto the motif, which can be magnified millions of times. There are two variants of the instrument: the transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the scanning or scanning electron microscope (SEM).

Video: This Pulsating Slime Mold Comes in Peace ft. It's Okay to Be Smart. Deep Look (February 2020).

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