Body

How does a human hand work?

Under the skin of the hand is a complex network of bones and joints.

A handshake is not just a greeting.

© SHUTTERSTOCK

The hand is a sensitive gripping tool and an important sensory organ that consists of a complex system of bones, muscles, joints, connective tissue, tendons, nerves and blood vessels.

The bones and muscles together give the hand its strength, thanks to joints the hand is flexible and nerves provide the sense of touch.

Powerful muscles in the forearm flex the fingers and joints through long, slender tendons.

In addition, there are a number of small muscles in the hand that control the precise movements of the fingers with the help of a very complex interaction.

For example, you can write with a pen or thread a thread through a needle.

The hand consists of the carpal, middle hand and fingers.

The skin of the palm and fingers has grooves that form a unique pattern for everyone. The hairless skin gives a better grip.

© SHUTTERSTOCK

The carpal is a mosaic of eight bones in two rows, held together by tight bands.

One bone per finger forms the middle hand. The middle-leg of the thumb is shorter than the other four, but the so-called basic joint is a lot more flexible than that of the other fingers.

This allows the thumb to turn in front of the palm, which makes it easy for the hand to grasp something.

The hand is our most important tool

27 legs, held together by muscles and tendons, form our flexible hand. All parts work together seamlessly if the hand grabs something.

THEREFORE WE GIVE A HAND TO EACH OTHER

Shaking hands is a sign of confidence. An empty, outstretched right hand shows that someone comes in peace and does not carry weapons.

The ritual can be traced back to the 5th century BC: on Greek vases, soldiers shake hands.

Video: Hand Anatomy Animated Tutorial (January 2020).

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