Sea animals

Deep sea is teeming with huge, greedy and poisonous worms

They are sneaky, slimy and deadly. In and on the seabed there are worms of up to 55 meters long that with their branched tongues and razor-sharp jaws make the lives of the other bottom animals a hell.

The vast majority of sea worms are peaceful filter animals that live a peaceful life on the bottom. For example, you will hardly ever see the sandworm unless you are a fisherman. Only his sandy excrements on the seabed bear witness to his existence.

But if you dive deeper, especially in tropical waters, you will see greedy worms constantly lurking for their next meal.

Worm gets its name from severed penis

The most horrible worm from the depth is the Eunice aphroditois, which is in English Bobbit Worm hot. With his razor-sharp jaws fully open, he lies in the sand waiting for an unsuspecting prey.

The worm was named after the American Lorena Bobbit, who in 1996 attacked her husband's penis with scissors.

Greedy worm burns like jellyfish

Fire worm (Hermodice carunculata) is the name of a genus of 15 to 30 centimeters long greedy worms, which occur in the Mediterranean Sea among others.

The brushes along the sides of the fire worm are hollow and contain nerve poison. When you touch it, the spines of the brushes get caught in your skin, so you are treated for days with burning pain.

Slime worm shoots out branched tongue

Cordworms are a genus of worms that can shoot a trunk-like organ out of the mouth. The organ may be covered with poisonous spines that paralyze the prey or culminate in branches that enclose the victim before being drawn into the mouth.

Cordworms are among the tallest animals in the world and can reach 55 meters.

Worms keep giant orgies in the Pacific Ocean

Some are greedy and underhanded, others engage in extensive group sex in the warm surface waters of the South Pacific. Read more about palolo and other ocean worms in our long article:

Video: This Rare Cheese Is Infested With Live Maggots (January 2020).

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